‘If I see a tree that looks like it should be climbed, then I’m going to climb it’ : Weak Anarchy with Tom Pope.

Arnolfini, Artist, Arts, Events, Performance, Photography, Workshop

As Part of our Young Artist Series, this month we were fortunate enough to take part in a workshop hosted by the eternally playful Tom Pope.

Oranges

First he shares with us some of his incredible work along with a handful of peculiar stories that paint him out to be a neighbourhood terror in a comic or something.

Tom Pope’s shirt is the colour of lemons and by his feet is a bag of oranges. These oranges will be thrown with reckless abandon into the path of cameras that are hungry to catch the oranges before they collide with walls and floors, splitting their skins in a shower of orange juice.

If the camera is successful in ‘catching’ the orange the photograph is essentially spoiled by an obscure orange blur.

IMG_9734 IMG_9750 IMG_9752


The next act in the workshop has us locked in photographic combat, our fingers poised on each other’s triggers. Maeve’s lens is pointed at me and mine at her, ready to shoot. But we don’t want to shoot each other, we want to shoot ourselves. I want to capture a thousand of my own images with Maeve’s camera but I don’t want her to snap herself on mine. So now we’re dancing, everyone in the room is dancing! Like a group of couples in the ballroom of a cruise ship that’s hit choppy waters and scattered us about. And all the time we’re going in circles, trying to move our camera away from their faces whilst drawing theirs towards us.

I’m almost as tragic at writing about this as I was in actually doing it. My chaotic brain can’t handle the two actions at once and I unknowingly let Maeve photograph her laughing face over and over and over while I fail to capture my own.

 IMG_9763 IMG_9787IMG_9772 IMG_9762

And now (with our cameras still citrus-scented) we are temporarily blinded and guided through the gallery; shakily up and down stairs, awkwardly into lifts, clinging on to walls and sometimes each other, led under chairs and tables  until something in our sightless minds tell us the moment is right to take the photograph and open two sets of eyes at once.

 IMG_9840 IMG_9834IMG_9829

My photograph is a white-out because I had my camera on the wrong setting. The camera was as blind as I was and the image is a total nothingness. The outcome isn’t always as important as the process.


In the last part of our first workshop we do what Tom Pope does best: we play a game. Here are the seven rules to live by if you want to get involved and play the YA Game of Photography:

1. Offside rule.
2. No zoom.
3. If someone shouts ‘You!’ And points, everyone must photograph them.
4. Eye contact with the lens makes the picture invalid.
5. Cannot have two feet on the floor when taking a picture.
6. After taking a picture you have to turn 180 degrees
7. Must shout ‘Yes!’ when taking a picture

IMG_9859 IMG_9861 IMG_9866


You can go and peep at Tom Pope’s work here: http://www.tompope.co.uk/

Advertisements

Deborah Pearson – ‘The Future Show’

Performance

As with many events I go and see at the Arnolfini, I went to go and see Deborah Pearson’s The Future Show with very little idea of what it may be. I think the best description I got beforehand was simply the title; The Future Show.

The Future Show

During the performance Deborah Pearson read from a folder in front of her like a soothsayer revealing her predictions for near, not so distant and far off futures. Some of which didn’t happened, and some of which did,

“You will clap. Even those of you who were a bit bored will clap because it’s a comfortable way to signal an ending.”

It’s really quite a hard show to summarise because of its simplicity, but that is where it shines most. I found her calm American tone very disarming which lead me to believe even some of her more absurd predictions, of which include a seagull in a pocket.

As a whole I would suggest to anyone to go and see The Future Show whether they were interested in performance or not, because at the very basis of the performance is something we all seek, comfort in knowing or guessing what the future may hold.

Thanks for reading,

Charlie CT

rifeWhen: Wed 18th of June 2014

Time: 5:45pm – 8pm

Where: Watershed – 1 Canon’s Road, Harbourside, BS1 5TX Bristol, United Kingdom

 

Since February I’ve been part of Talent Lab, a Bristol-based group of 23 creatives formed by the collaboration of Watershed and award-winning creative agency, Latimer. We were commissioned by Bristol Youth Links in partnership with Bristol City Council to shape an online platform for Bristol’s youth with an eagerness to create content for the youth by the youth. Thankfully this meant goodbye to all things stereotypically appeasing to us, the youth, like the horrid cliché that was the Go Places Do Things graffiti font. Bless their souls, they kind of tried.

Bristol Talent Lab

So where did we go from there? Rife, baby. Well, a nameless Rife magazine. We knew exactly what we wanted but it took much longer to finally figure out a name. How does ‘rife’ feel on your tongue? Kind of funny? It takes a few attempts getting used to it but it’s a grower. After months of hard work building up content by the core Rife team, as a digital phoenix our baby has risen out of the cliché ashes with some stories going viral and over 10,000 unique site views in less than a month …and we are not even officially launched yet!

With just over 24 hours to go before the Rife Live Launch excitement and anxiety seems to have dangerously merged.

But that’s not stopping us because Rife is yours – all you bloggers, vloggers, photographers, writers, budding journalists, aspiring editors, ranters, reviewers, tweeters, Facebook fanatics, Tumblr scrollers, filmmakers, comedians, storytellers, cartoonists, graphic designers or simply good at generating good ideas. With so much to offer on the night; from making your own gifs, telling us what Grinds Your Gears, pitching ideas for Rife to our team, networking with industry professionals (LatimerClockwise Media amongst others) and listening to acclaimed creator of The Hip Hop Shakespeare CompanyAkala; all we ask is that you RSVP to editor@rifemagazine.co.uk to confirm your place*.

AND if that’s still not exciting enough, through getting involved you can get media training, mentoring, access to equipment, industry links and profile. So even if you can’t make the 18th Rife magazine still wants you! Check out http://www.rifemagazine.co.uk/get-involved/ to find out how you can still get involved.

I hope I’ll be seeing you there – look out for the girl with the R-shaped earrings!

 

*doors open at 5:45 to those who have RSVP’d and by 5:50/55pm any unclaimed RSVP’d spaces are then opened up to the public with a first come first serve system.

Animation, Art, Article, Artist, Arts, Books/Comics, Bristol, Cinema, Drawing, Events, Fashion, Games, Illustrator, Inspirational, Launch, Literature, Music, Origami, Painting, Performace, Performance art, Photography, Poetry, Printing, Theatre, Uncategorized, Video, Watershed, Workshop

5Hz Arnolfini Opportunity

Art, Artist, Bristol, Performance art

5Hz

Arnolfini have an exciting interactive opportunity for young people to take part in, that I thought I’d share with you all!

Arnolfini are looking for participants aged between 18-25 to take part in a three hour long workshop for a collaborative project by artist Emma Smith, based on the idea of creating an alternative evolution of voice for social bonding, with the aim of creating a language that makes us feel connected.

Participants need to be available on one of the following dates:

28th April 2.30pm – 5.30pm

6th May 11am-2pm

7th May 11am-2pm

11th June 2-5pm

12th June 2-5pm

Lots of us from Young Arnolfini are going to participating, and it would be great to see more young people there!

If you are interested in taking part in this opportunity please email Ellie Jeffs ellie.jeffs@arnolfini.org.uk by 5pm Monday 14 April, confirming which workshop date you would like to attend.

Shangaan Electro

Bristol, Inspirational, Music, Performance, Uncategorized, Workshop
Nozinja in Soweto, 2010 from Dazed and Confused interview.

Nozinja in Soweto, 2010 from Dazed and Confused interview.

On Tuesday Charlie and I had the opportunity to be involved in a workshop with the brilliant Shangaan Electro. Visiting a primary school in St. George, the South African group stirred much curiosity and enthusiasm among the 7 – 11 years olds bouncing around their school hall, waiting to be taught some basics of the traditional dance in their after school activity.

The regenerated music genre of Shangaan Electro has slowly enveloped the world, taking marimba beats to whole new levels of vigorous speed and movement.  Traditionally slower (but by no means slow!), African Shangaan music used to average at around 110 beats per minute, but in 2005 when jolly chap Nozinja decided to get involved with music, he upped the beats per minute to 184.

Teaching the children basic steps and encouraging each of them to make the moves their own, not one child refused to enter the middle of the circle and demonstrate their dancing, with a lot of side stepping, circling and jigging around to all angles of the people watching them.

Usually attending clubs and events, a Primary school in Bristol was not an expected choice for the group to visit. Despite this, the joyful spirit of Shagnaan Electro with its highly charged and exciting pace and rhythm was undoubtedly an incredible experience for all involved. For each child exposed to a form of dance expression that had no rules other than tempo and for every adult who was witnessing the buzz and inspiration of the children taking part, we all left that afternoon with a faster spring in our step!

Random Acts

Music, Nature, Performance, Television, Video

I was flicking through the channels on TV to find something on to watch and when I got to Channel 4 I was confronted with this video as part of their random acts which are video interventions somewhat like a flashmob but for telly.

I jumped straight to the computer to share it with everyone because of how impressive and cool it is. I think what is happening is that he is using the vegetables and fruit as an electrical output and they are hooked up to the synth he has essentially making them another key on the piano. Never the less this is still really fun and clever.

Check out the guys soundcloud and I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

-Charlie C-T

Sunday Round-Up: London Trip

Music, Performance, Poetry, Roundup, sculpture

Yesterday, a group of Young Arnolfini members visited Standpoint Gallery in London to take part in a 2-hour workshop with Duchamp & Sons. The workshop was centred around the Bobby’s Recital exhibition currently being held at the gallery, and touched upon things such as the creative use of musical instruments, sound, language and words.

Here are some of our experiences/highlights of this trip:

Jacob

One of the things that caught my eye as soon as I walked into the gallery space was the presence of a prepared grand piano, with coloured egg-shells resting on the strings. We talked briefly during the workshop about the strange effect that static instruments have in a space; such as instruments left on stage after a performance, or a piano that nobody plays in a household. I liked the way the piano was presented both as an instrument for performance and as a sculpture.

DSC_0085DSC_0087DSC_0072DSC_0075

I was really interested in the possibilities of a prepared piano, and how artists such as John Cage experiment with music. Below is an example of a prepared piano being played:

Grace

I was really interested in the elements of performance within the work of the two artists who were running the workshop; Bryony Gillard and Jenny Moore. After seeing some of their work we were invited to take part in tasks.

Bryony had us experiment with words, playing a game of consequences with random sentences, the results of which were often quite surreal and poetic. Unfortunately I think someone picked mine up by mistake, otherwise I’d post some. Then we worked with the piano to see how words sounded once spelt on the piano.

Jenny’s part of the workshop involved the group collaborating to produce a radio show. This one is harder to explain, but the were no rules, only a set of suggestions. As the work developed my group ended up working towards a specific goal, which was translating the sounds of a guitar through phone signals, a toy megaphone and finally the camera’s recording equipment.

The experience gave me lots to consider. I’m starting my final project soon and have been considering moving into performance and video art, and the workshop allowed me to see other artistic methods and results. Overall I really enjoyed the whole day and really look forward to working with Duchamp & Sons in the future!

Tom

A poem compiled sentence by sentence from Young Arnolfini and Duchamp & Sons:

I ran down the narrow empty path,
In need of summer sun,
It didn’t matter anyway so I just left and went home,
As long as I get my kiss…