The Story of Gelert || How to make a tent

Architecture, Arnolfini, Art, Article, Artist, Arts, Bristol, Drawing, Events, Exhibition, Facebook, Nature, Painting, Performace, Performance, Performance art, YA Meeting

Initially the group began with the idea of Welsh folk stories, which we were interested in because of the way that they are communicated. These stories were only passed by word of mouth, and have only been recorded in modern times.

 

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Buying fabric, and constructing the tent in Gallery 1, Arnolfini

 

The group explored these stories, becoming attached to ‘The story of Gelert’ and the Welsh language, mainly its translation and mistranslation into English and other languages. This lead us to explore translation, which became the centre of the project.

The group wanted to create a den or tent like space to present the story, as we felt that this was the perfect storytelling environment.

After we had decided on creating a tent space, we were given found footage of a family putting up a tent. This coincidence re-affirmed our tent concept, and became a really important part of the work.

 

The story of Gelert continues to be an integral part of the work and its creation.

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Interview: Jen Howarth

Art, Article, Artist, Arts, Bristol, Drawing, Inspirational, Interview, Printing

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I caught up with Jen Howarth just after she’d dropped her work off for an exhibition she’s currently in with Synecdoche Art Collective – a group show by recent graduates and current students of Drawing and Applied Arts at UWE – at the Christmas Steps Gallery. (It’s pronounced si-nek-duh-kee in case you were wondering). In the gallery Jen is exhibiting Jetty [above] (and the original etching print inc. metallic spray paint water is every bit as beautiful in the flesh), while in the Synecdoche pop up shop area Jen has prints, badges and t-shirts for sale. I kind of want to own all of her work.

Interesting Things Around Bristol Recently #33 & #34

Architecture, Art, Bristol, Drawing, Nature, Photography

IMG_6558 At Uni my tutor told me to ‘notice what you notice’, so ever since I’ve been collecting photographs on my website with the title ‘Interesting Things Around Bristol Recently‘ .

Eden 4 Artist Lab Finishing Party

Art, Artist, Arts, Bristol, Drawing, Events, Exhibition, Launch, Painting

A few weeks ago I had the delight of attending Eden 4’s Artist Lab Finishing Party, and thought I would share some of the exciting work created during their week-long residency at Centrespace gallery.

Eden 4Eden 4

Rosie Dolton, Beckie Upton, Rachel Falber and Amy Higgins are four female artists from the south west who form the collective Eden 4.

Eden 4 aim to explore the darker symbolism behind fairy tales, myth and religion within their work, and it is evident in the work of Amy Higgins and Rachel Falber that they take inspiration from Greek mythology and Grimms’ fairy tales.

On the group’s website they write:

“We propose to make installations, drawings, sculpture and embroidery based on ideas which will challenge the viewers traditional ideas of ‘Happily ever after’.”

It is this variety of work, and the assortment of textures and materials used by the artists that create visual excitement within the space.

The work on paper is sometimes on scrap material or card, and sometimes on pristine watercolour paper. This is altered in Rosie Dolton’s textile work, which sometimes mimics a drawing, where the thread becomes the line of the pencil.

Eden 4Eden 4

Eden 4 run projects and workshops, and in this exhibition were able to invite the public to have an exclusive look at the artists’ workspace, to see how the work is made and the processes behind its production.

It is in the opportunity to look at artists creating art that the boundaries are broken between the gallery space (and resolved work) and the artist’s studio. Creation is undoubtedly the most important part of the artwork, but is left out of the gallery space, with artist’s studios and gallery spaces being almost polar opposites.

In each of the works presented in the space composition is an important aspect of them all. Each artist has made careful aesthetic judgements ranging from colour to how the work is arranged in the space.

The references the female body, sometimes spliced with animal parts or bird skulls that become new mythological creatures, are prominent, and become the most noticeable subject in the collection of work. The spliced animal drawings of Amy Higgins create a female Minotaur, which subverts the Greek Myth of the male Minotaur unnatural offspring of a woman and a beast.

Sometimes exploring the female body in their work, Rosie Dolton and Beckie Upton Both use text and incorporate slogans, borrowing the aesthetic of fashion magazines, using phrases such as lecherous which confronts the viewer and forces them to question the male gaze and the sexualised imagery seen in the media.

There are strong feminist undertones in every artist of Eden 4, which become more powerful when brought together as a collective.

Eden 4

Follow Eden 4 on Facebook or Twitter.

Or visit their website: eden4.org.uk

 

‘Sub-Doodling’, press ups and Lady Gaga..

Art, Artist, Drawing, Events, Illustrator, Inspirational, Interview, Uncategorized

Becky, Cai and Emma as drawn by Joff

Becky, Cai and Emma as drawn by Joff

Cai, Emma and myself recently attended an arts conference at @Bristol, on Disability Led arts hosted by two organisations; the Bristol and Brighton Steering Groups. Designed to inform and inspire the public on disability within the arts today, the conference was attended by people nationwide.

During we met Joff, the events graphic artist who caught our attention right from the start of the day. So, we eventually managed to corner him and fire a few questions his way.

Here is the conversation we had about ‘Sub-Doodling’, press ups and Lady Gaga..

Joff, we thought you would be an incredibly interesting and inspiring person to interview, as Young Arnolfini is all about making art more accessible to young people and today really has opened up our eyes to disability within the arts.

4How long have you been drawing?

I’ve been drawing all time, the whole time.. all my life.

So are you a full time illustrator?

No, I’m not good enough to do that, I can’t draw buildings or vehicles very well!

Oh no, you shouldn’t consider those things as limitations!

Well…. I like doing my press-ups so.. wait what? Sorry what was the question?!

[There’s a lot of laughter at this point as Joff is obviously distracted as he watches people walk by that he could be drawing..]

The question was ‘are you a full time illustrator’?

Ermm I draw a lot of the time, like a lot of the things I do, I do in drawings but I’m not really an illustrator because you have to be able to draw buildings..

There’s no rules to illustration! Can you speak a bit about your work and your style? Do you think you have a particular style?

My style for these kind of events, when I’m documenting things, I’d say is actually quantity not quality! I can do a lot of drawings but a lot of them are pretty bad but as long as I can get the feeling across of what is vaguely going on at the event.

3

So would you say your style is fast paced and doodle like?

It’s like ‘sub doodle’..

That’s a cool description of it! So do you think that your disability affects you in any ways, positively or negatively?

Ah, that’s a good question.. Er, well maybe it makes people be a bit nicer to me! They’re more forgiving of the not very good likenesses in my drawings! Erm, I don’t know.. well, no.. I don’t know! Sometimes I’m probably a bit more messy than I would be, you know, like if I’ve got a big pile of paper, maybe I’ll drop a few more sheets than someone with a normal hand.. When I’m doing my press ups I have to put a book under my stump to make it the right height!

Do you think anyone can draw?

YES! Definitely..

Do you think everyone should draw?

Yes as well! Definitely!

Do you think thats part of where your practice comes from? From drawing everything, you just get better and better at documenting?

Yes, I love it when other people draw! In fact, Sarah did one of the drawings today, I got her to do it because I got bored of it..

What advise would you give a young person with a disability who would like to go into the arts? Especially drawing, as we have been watching you all day and you have such confidence to just approach people and start drawing them.4

Just draw. I know some of these people here, mainly because I’m a huge fan of their work.. I’m a huge fan but not really into contemporary art so much.. but I just really love people who draw! I don’t really know what I’m talking about.. Some people do really realistic, detailed pencils drawings of Lady Gaga.. what am I talking about, I don’t know..

You’re talking about really realistic, detailed pencil drawings of Lady Gaga to an illustrator who does detailed pencil drawings and portraits! Cai has actually drawn Lady Gaga..

Have you?! It’s like two ends of the same string linking up! I can’t draw Lady Gaga.. I can draw a meat dress but I can’t draw the face.. Sorry Cai!

If you could give your 16 year old self a piece of advise, what would it be?

Be nice to your mum. No I was quite nice to my mum.. I’d say don’t talk as much! Id say that to myself now too!

Have you ever experienced any discrimination?

What because I’ve got like one hand? You mean?

Yeah.

Er nah not really.. people are nice!

People are nice to me a lot too, I think it’s my height! I’m short and I think people pity me!

Oh yeah you are quite short!

We really loved all the illustrations Joff created, and below are only a selection of all the ones he created. There were so many, it was hard to choose! Take a look:

Thanks for reading,

Becky

rifeWhen: Wed 18th of June 2014

Time: 5:45pm – 8pm

Where: Watershed – 1 Canon’s Road, Harbourside, BS1 5TX Bristol, United Kingdom

 

Since February I’ve been part of Talent Lab, a Bristol-based group of 23 creatives formed by the collaboration of Watershed and award-winning creative agency, Latimer. We were commissioned by Bristol Youth Links in partnership with Bristol City Council to shape an online platform for Bristol’s youth with an eagerness to create content for the youth by the youth. Thankfully this meant goodbye to all things stereotypically appeasing to us, the youth, like the horrid cliché that was the Go Places Do Things graffiti font. Bless their souls, they kind of tried.

Bristol Talent Lab

So where did we go from there? Rife, baby. Well, a nameless Rife magazine. We knew exactly what we wanted but it took much longer to finally figure out a name. How does ‘rife’ feel on your tongue? Kind of funny? It takes a few attempts getting used to it but it’s a grower. After months of hard work building up content by the core Rife team, as a digital phoenix our baby has risen out of the cliché ashes with some stories going viral and over 10,000 unique site views in less than a month …and we are not even officially launched yet!

With just over 24 hours to go before the Rife Live Launch excitement and anxiety seems to have dangerously merged.

But that’s not stopping us because Rife is yours – all you bloggers, vloggers, photographers, writers, budding journalists, aspiring editors, ranters, reviewers, tweeters, Facebook fanatics, Tumblr scrollers, filmmakers, comedians, storytellers, cartoonists, graphic designers or simply good at generating good ideas. With so much to offer on the night; from making your own gifs, telling us what Grinds Your Gears, pitching ideas for Rife to our team, networking with industry professionals (LatimerClockwise Media amongst others) and listening to acclaimed creator of The Hip Hop Shakespeare CompanyAkala; all we ask is that you RSVP to editor@rifemagazine.co.uk to confirm your place*.

AND if that’s still not exciting enough, through getting involved you can get media training, mentoring, access to equipment, industry links and profile. So even if you can’t make the 18th Rife magazine still wants you! Check out http://www.rifemagazine.co.uk/get-involved/ to find out how you can still get involved.

I hope I’ll be seeing you there – look out for the girl with the R-shaped earrings!

 

*doors open at 5:45 to those who have RSVP’d and by 5:50/55pm any unclaimed RSVP’d spaces are then opened up to the public with a first come first serve system.

Animation, Art, Article, Artist, Arts, Books/Comics, Bristol, Cinema, Drawing, Events, Fashion, Games, Illustrator, Inspirational, Launch, Literature, Music, Origami, Painting, Performace, Performance art, Photography, Poetry, Printing, Theatre, Uncategorized, Video, Watershed, Workshop

UWE Bower Ashton Degree Show

Bristol, Cinema, Drawing, Exhibition, Photography, Video

A few other Young Arnolfini members suggested that I make my way up to the UWE Bower Ashton Degree Show for the Private Viewing last Friday, as they have some of their work up there. Three Young Arnolfini Members were graduating including Katie Morgan and Ross Williams, who were doing Photography and Alice Titshall who studied Drawing and Applied Arts. I really liked all of their work, and it was a brilliant evening – SO much amazing work!

There was so much to see there and there was work all over the campus. Loads of people turned up and it was a really exciting and lively evening. I found all of the work there really inspiring and its made me want to create more of my own – as well as getting me excited for when I start university!

My favourite section had to be the Illustration area, as there was such a variety of work, and it was all so interesting to look at! They did the same things in completely different ways!

I took a few photos of some of my favourites there, but its really worth checking out yourself! The Degree show is on untill the 12th of June, and most of the work is in the Bower Ashton campus. I’d really suggest making your way down and having a look at all the work!

ImageImage  ImageImage

 

Can courtroom sketches be beautiful?

Artist, Drawing, Illustrator

I’ve always felt that Courtroom sketch artists are under appreciated. Firstly, I’m going to go out on a limb, and say that I’ve always found their work beautiful. Odd, because arguably the job of an artist is to notice beauty and capture it, yet this is not the job of the courtroom artist. The courtroom artist captures humanity, arguably at its worst. It captures the expressions of delinquents, those accused of the abhorrent, and of their victims. The perpetrators, the accusers, the lawyers and the judges. Even the stagnant feel of injustice. But ultimately it captures drama.

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I recently watched a short doc about a renowned courtroom sketch artist in the States, Gary Myrick, who’s documented trials ranging from famous politicians to serial killers and arms merchants. The courtroom artist’s primary job is to capture moments of such trials in order to sell them to the press, at such times where filming and photography isn’t allowed. Myrick’s work is stunning, this no doubt the cause of his popularity,expressing such breath taking detail in his drawings.

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I was so impressed with Myrick’s style I decided to contact him via email to ask how he created such detailed, stylised work, and from life. Gary was kind enough to reply:

Regarding drawing from life, I recommend taking a mental snapshot first, then just laying the image out roughly and refining it as I go along. You can draw from life anywhere and anytime. Whatever one learns from doing that can be applied to any locale, whether it be a courtroom, a park or wherever. Learning about gesture drawing is also very valuable.

Taking this in to consideration, Myrick’s style of drawing is definitely one I’d study further, as well as his approach to drawing from life. In honesty, I’ve never been interested in the courtroom itself, but more the style of drawing that’s usually applied to courtroom art, and its capturing of drama, which of course can be applied anywhere.

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Here’s a link to the original article and short film, featured in the New York Times, a much more in depth look in to the life of Gary Myrick and the struggle that came with the decline of Courtroom art in America.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/opinion/courtroom-sketch-artist.html